In The News

Radiology Life • February 2017

5 ADVANCE FOR RADIOLOGY LiFE | IN THE N/ EWS EXECUTIVE MOVES SENO MEDICAL INSTRUMENTS — Seno Medical Instruments, a specialist in diagnosing breast cancer through the development of an opto-acoustic imaging SEPTEMBER 2016 device, announced the appointment of Steve Miller as SVP of Engineering. Miller previously served as the vice president of product realization at Fujifilm SonoSite, headquartered in Bothell, Wash. Miller spent the majority of his 30-year career on the development of medical imaging products that affect patients and customers. He was an inventor on more than 30 patents, while leading teams that received more than 200 patents. STRATEGIC RADIOLOGY — Strategic Radiology has selected Cheryl Proval to lead the company’s marketing and communication efforts. Proval spent 18 years covering the field of radiology as a journalist, serving as founding editor of the Radiology Business Journal and as vice president of publishing for ImagingBiz, a radiology content company. Prior to joining ImagingBiz, she served as publisher and editor of Imaging Economics. Most recently, she founded a radiology practice communication company, Vox Percipio. AMERCIAN BOARD OF RADIOLOGY — MThe American Board of Radiology (ABR) named Donald P. Frush, MD, FACR, as chair of its Board of Trustees. He succeeded former Board of Trustees Chair Dennis M. Balfe, MD. Frush is Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics, faculty member of the Medical Physics Graduate Program, and chief Vice Chair for Safety and Quality in the Department of Radiology at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C. In addition to primary certification in diagnostic radiology, he holds a subspecialty certification in pediatric radiology, both from ABR. INDUSTRY ANALYSIS JOB OUTLOOK — Based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)1, jobs in the radiology field are set grow rapidly in the coming years. Employment of radiologic technologists is expected to grow 9% from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all other occupations. Employment of MRI technologists is projected to grow 10% from 2014 to 2024, also faster than the average for all occupations. BLS stated that as the “population grows older, there will be an increase in medical conditions, such as cancer and Alzheimer’s disease, which require imaging as a tool for making diagnoses. Radiologic and MRI technologists will be needed to take the images. In addition, the number of individuals who have access to health insurance is expected to continue to increase because of federal health insurance reform.” Taken together, these factors indicate continued strong job growth across the radiologic field. “However,” BLS cautioned, “employment growth of radiologic and MRI technologists may be tempered, as many medical facilities and third-party payers encourage the use of less-costly, noninvasive imaging technologies, such as ultrasound.” BLS also posits that technologists who graduate from accredited programs and who earn multiple certifications will have the best job prospects in this advancing market. REFERENCE • Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2016-17 Edition, Radiologic and MRI Technologists. https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/ radiologic-technologists.htm (visited February 01, 2017). SALARY PROJECTIONS — According to Payscale.com’s 2016 Salary Survey, the median salary for radiologists remained in the high six-figures at just under $287,000 per year. Geographic location and career duration (experience) make up the two largest determining variables among the respondents. Many cities, including Philadelphia, San Francisco, Denver and Dallas all pay above the national average. On the other hand, cities like Miami, Houston and Cleveland pay somewhat below the national average, indicating that place of residence is a strong predictor of earnings. In addition, radiologists with substantial experience in the field stand to be better compensated than less-experienced peers. For instance, radiologists with experience ranging from 10-20 years earned approximately $323,000, while peers with less than five years of industry experience earned around $256,000 on average. This indicates that experience, along with geographic locality, can be among the strongest indicators of earning potential across the radiology field. In The News


Radiology Life • February 2017
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